Sunday, September 7, 2014

What's next? (8) 1959 Topps vs (5) 1967 Topps


The semi-finals will be the first time that I have injected personal feelings/commentary into the opening post.   I've tried to be as impartial as possible in the earlier rounds, and now I think a little sentiment may go a long way (for me...lol).


How they got this far:

1959 defeated 1966 and 1965 Topps, gaining 11 votes in both rounds.
1967 defeated 1962 with 16 votes, and then 1976 with 17 votes.

To sum up the first two rounds:

I would have thought that 1959 would have had an easier time in the first round against '66, but it was close.  I fully expected a close match against '65, and was a little surprised that '59 gained a quarter final victory (I originally thought that '65 was going to be a finalist, if not win the whole tourney).

I didn't think that '67 would make it by '62 Topps in the first round ('62 is one of my favorite sets).  I was pretty sure that it would defeat '76, but didn't think that the voting would be as lopsided.  (I thought that '67 may win one round, but not make it as far as the semis---what do I know??)

What I think will happen in this round:  

I think that the voting is going to be close in this round, but a lot of people in the last round really surprised me with their strong feelings for '67. 

I think that '67 wins this round and moves on to the finals....but that's up to you now, isn't it??

thanks for reading, and for voting!  Robert


17 comments:

  1. I'll start the voting and the commenting this time. 1967 Topps reminds me of those "Generic" food cans from the early 1980s. You know the ones I mean? Those products in white packages with black all cap lettering that said, "BEER" or "VANILLA ICE CREAM" or "LUNCHEON LOAF" (Just go to Google Image Search and Google "Generic Food can 1980").

    In other words, 1967 cards look boring. They are not distinctive. They look like the precursor to today's yawn-inducing white-bordered Topps cards.

    On the other hand, the 1959 Topps cards have color -- different colors for different teams, even. 1959 then goes all e e cummings on us by not capitalizing names. They have cartoon logos on the front. In short, they are distinctive.

    I'm strongly in the 1959 camp.

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    1. Your reasoning makes no sense.

      In the last round for the 1967 set, you said "I see the allure of both sets". Now, 3 weeks later, all of a sudden, they "look boring"?

      Also, as anyone can plainly see, the 1967 cards have the same amount of white border as the 1959s. So your "precursor to today's yawn-inducing white-bordered Topps cards" comment seems irrelevant here, but would be valid toward, for example, the 1964 set.

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  2. 1967. How can you not vote for a set that has this card?

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  3. I'm not going to do any campaigning for '59. I think it stands on it's own and is worlds' ahead of the '67 set.

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  4. Gah. Tough choice. I see the '59 side because it's distinctive, colorful, probably iconic, and represents its time as well as any set out there. I see the '67 side because it's simple and classy (NOT boring) and features the photo better than any other set in the '60s. It is ahead of its time.

    '59 should probably win, but I like '67 better. I'm voting for '67.

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  5. I gotta go with 1959. When I first got back into collecting, '59 was the first vintage White Sox team set I wanted to build, since it was the last AL pennant they won. This was prior to 2005. Nothing against '67 - it is a great set. But my nod goes to '59.

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  6. Tough choice, but I vote for 1959. The tiebreaker for me is the logos on the 59.

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  7. I like both sets now, but the 1959 set had to grow on me, while I've always liked 1967. Add to that the larger photo and the "less is more" design and I have to go with 1967.

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  8. Even though I like the logo on 59, I gotta vote 67.

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  9. This is a little tougher than I thought, but I think I will have to go with the 1959 set.

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  10. I'll go w/'67. My Willie McCovey card from that set was the first big money ($18) I ever spent on a card, and was the oldest card in my collection for a really long time. I now have a handful of cards that predate '67, but it's still the most I've ever spent on a card.

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  11. My vote for this round is 1959.

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  12. I love both sets. I'll go with 1959 (but just barely -- just by the length of Wally Moon's unibrow).

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